Resources and Tools for Elementary Math Specialists and Teachers
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K-5 Standards for Mathematical Practice - 2. Reason Abstractly and Quantitatively

This 26-minute Flash presentation helps educators understand the intent of CCSS Mathematical Practice 2 and its implications for the K-5 classroom. It suggests strategies for helping children develop the following proficiencies: strong number sense, the ability to decontextualize problems from words to symbols and re-contextualize results, the ability to make sense of quantities and relationships in problem contexts, and operational fluency. A transcript (pdf) of the video is available for download.
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(1 Comments)
Contributed by: McGraw-Hill Education, Publisher
This resource is included in the following PD Collection(s):
CCSS Practice Standard 2This collection aims to shed light on Practice Standard 2: Reason abstractly and quantitatively, and offers instructional strategies for helping students make sense of quantities and their relationships in problem situations. These resources provide meaningful ways to support children as they learn to represent problem contexts with numbers and symbols, and then re-interpret the numbers and symbols in terms of the original problem. A companion Classroom Collection includes resources to help teachers develop this practice with their students.
Math TopicNumber Sense, Mathematical Practices, Mathematical Processes
Grade LevelK, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Resource TypeInstructional Strategy, Reference Materials

  • Additional Information
    • AudienceEducator
    • LanguageEnglish (USA)
    • Education TopicTeaching strategies
    • Interdisciplinary Connection
    • Professional DevelopmentYes
    • ContributorMcGraw-Hill Education, Publisher
    • Publication Date2012
    • RightsCopyright (c) McGraw-Hill Education
      http://www.mheducation.com/terms-use
    • AccessFree access
  • Standards
    • Common Core State Standards for Mathematics

      Select a standards document:

  • User Comments
    • 5
      thanks
      By JimWallace on 11/10/2015 - 12:29
    • A really great collection. Even a writer like myself who can only write my essays and fail at solving problems can easily understand these.